Nyanko Days Reviews

nyanko-daysStory:
Konagai Tomoko is a shy girl who owns three cats. She meets a popular girl who owns a cat. They become friends. The “cats” are chibi cat girls. That’s it. That’s all there is. How in the world was this funded again?

Violence:
None.

Language:
None.

Nudity:
None. The “cats” are tiny cat girls, but we’re spared anything gross or sexualizing. Although what with the whole loli thing, it’s hard to tell sometimes…

Theology/mythology:
Aside from cat girls (a thing which is never explained), nothing here.

Personal impression:
This whole series is around a half hour long grand total. It has no plot. There is no point. The characters aren’t horrid, but they aren’t good either. I can see this mini series as existing for two reasons. 1) Filler between other shows airing on TV or 2) promos to get a full series deal. Regardless, it seems like a real waste of money. No matter how short a show is, it still takes money to make it and I just don’t understand how this little thing could make up its own production costs. Especially when, due to having no actual story, it’s so forgettable.
Of course, if you need something cute and kid friendly and non-offensive (generally), this show is just fine. It’s rare for me to be able to mark a show as All Ages, so woowho for that. But besides those reasons…. this show has nothing unique to offer. Unless you love watching cute cat girls. Like a lot.

Personal rating: All Ages

Episodes: 12 (episodes are 2 mins long)
Languages: sub
Official rating: n/a
Genre: Cute things, slice of life
Production: EMT Squared
Company: YTV
Official streaming: crunchyroll

Warning Zone: Seiren

seirenThe What:
Our main wimpy guy has no ambition or talent. Irritated that one of his female classmates seems to have more direction than he does, he forces himself to go on an academic retreat with a friend. But the girl who annoys and arouses him ends up there too because anime.

The Why:
This series doesn’t show that much, but it implies a lot. Our main character has rather… graphic imaginings about his classmate. We don’t see breasts or butts, but we hear his dialog ramble. Around episode 3 or 4 the combination of sexual inner dialog and his fantasy of seeing her pee was too much and I cut ties. Technically we don’t see much other than a lump of our lead’s erection, but with the twisted dialog and wondering camera… it’s very obvious that this show is just barely staying from an M rating. But let’s be honest. It requires an M anyway.
That being said, I can see why a few people might like this show. It’s pretty brutal about the typical awakenings of the teen sex drive and it is nice to see a lead actually wish to better himself outside of the female lead. It has a few.. interesting points. But it has far too much perv for me to stick around…

March Comes in Like a Lion Review

march-comes-inStory:
Rei Kiriyama is a 17 year old pro shoji player (Japanese chess) who makes more at what he does than most adults. Even so, he feels incomplete…

Violence:
Nothing much here. Most of the story revolves around shoji, which isn’t exactly a contact sport. That said, there is a bit of domestic violence implied with a few characters. Nothing too graphic, but it’s uncomfortable at the least.

Language:
We get spared anything too bad in this sector as well. A few d-mns is about as bad as it gets.

Nudity:
Aside from one scene of a girl changing, with a bra flying through the air, nothing here either. And fear not. It’s played for comedy and we’re spared any details.

Theology/mythology:
Nothing here besides seeing a few characters at shrines, praying for success and such. No discussion is had on these things, however.

Personal impression:
This was a wonderful show. It’s second season was one that seemed to lose momentum for many reviewers, but I personally enjoyed the second half better than the first. We get a lot of character growth from our lead. That said, I can see how if one pauses too much between seasons, it can feel as if there’s a lull in the story as the flow from the first to the second arc is pretty seamless.
Overall, I really do recommend this show to anyone who needs some solid characters and a heartfelt story. Not to mention artsy graphics that add to the wonderful “show don’t tell” theme within the series. The only thing I will warn about would be that this anime is like literary fiction put to screen. This isn’t really… genre stuff, which might put off people who are used to genre works. Technically you could say this is a sports anime… Except it’s not. It’s not traditional drama either (drama doesn’t happen just to happen, but often only occurs as a natural state of progression for story and characters). It’s not a love story or an action show… And I certainly wouldn’t call it a slice of life. This is just one of those shows that’s hard to put in a box and is all the better for it. If the slew of genre sludge that gets pumped out every season has you down, give this show a shot. It might just be the breath of fresh air you’ve been looking for.

Personal rating: 10+

Episodes: 22 (seasons 1 + 2)
Languages: sub
Official rating: TV14
Genre: Drama (not sure how else to mark this)
Production: Shaft
Company: Aniplex
Official streaming: crunchyroll