How to Keep a Mummy Review

316f66ac53da69f228cdb0ad9ca887cdStory:
Sora lives alone, his father having gone on yet another research trip. And per tradition, Sora soon gets one of his father’s surprise “gifts” in the mail. Terrified it’s another cursed item, especially as it’s in a coffin, he prepares for the worst only to find a tiny little mummy inside! A mummy that very much wants to stay with Sora permanently.

Violence:
In a few flash backs we see one character with slashed arms. Blood is shown though not overly focused on or seen more than a handful of times. There is the threat of some mythical creatures being very dangers to humans, even threatening to kill them. We never see this happen however.

Language:
There are some instances of d-mn and sh-t, but it’s not too common. One instance of the b-word occurs.

Nudity:
Some bath scenes with Sora are seen, but no details are shown and it’s not in a sexual light.

Theology/mythology:
This show contains all manner of both Japanese and western mythologies, with a few from the middle east thrown in (although it’s hilarious to note that the non-Japanese creatures tend to have their backgrounds mixed up quite a lot with various other tales. The mummy comes to Sora in a western style coffin, complete with Christian cross).

Personal impression:
This is defiantly one of those cute for the sake of being cute shows. Think of Hamtaro, but with more of an emphasis on the human characters interacting with the cute creatures than the creatures interacting with each other. It was ok for what it was, there was even some decent character development for a few of the leads, specifically the lead and his childhood friend. That said, there’s really not much substance to this one. And the last few episodes feel like the screenwriter suddenly decided to make their human characters x-men rip offs (one character climbs up a sheer cliff with his bare hands out of no where).
If you want cute fluff, this show will deliver. It even has a small amount of characters facing unspoken fears and growing a bit. Just not a lot.

Personal rating: 10+

Episodes: 12
Languages: sub
Official rating: TV14
Genres: Supernatural, slice of life
Studio: 8-Bit
Company: TBS
Official streaming: crunchyroll

Advertisements

Convenience Store Boy Friends Review

convenienceStory:
Two friends fall in love with two female classmates. Their stories will span an entire year.

Violence:
Pretty much nonexistent here. Not even nose bleeds. There is a character death off screen, but nothing scary is shown.

Language:
Another tame sector. Outside of sh-t and the occasional d-mn, nothing to report here.

Nudity:
Yet again, tame stuff. Nothing worse than bare man chests for swimming are seen. No fanservice at all, really. And I won’t lie, it was nice.

Theology/mythology:
Outside of one character making good luck charms for her classmates, nothing to put here.

Personal impression:
By all rights I could have marked this as an all ages show, but I’m erring on the side of caution due to the serious content, which isn’t kid centered stuff. And, yes, that does mean that this title drags a bit in places. The combination of serious tonality with a lack of any firm plot means we get a decent amount of aimlessness, at least at first we do. However, I found this show to be surprisingly grounded for a drama. The relationships actually make sense a decent amount of the time. So aside from a “plot twist” at the end, everything that happens is completely within the realm of possibility. In turn this made the emotional pull a bit stronger for me. I prefer logic to the over-the-top grandeur some shows are so addicted to these days.
All that said, overall this is still a pretty bland show. It has some decent ideas, but applied them in such a laidback manner that little gets done overall and some plot points just straight up get forgotten in the mix.
The animation reflects the tone well, decent enough at times but lacking in consistent quality, especially at the end where production takes a rather sharp drop (still backgrounds in place of moving animation, for example). The music is also all over the map, going from rather nice soft piano and violin to strange arcade-like music you’d find in Harvest Moon (I’d swear that was the “going into town in spring” theme).
Overall, this isn’t a bad show. But it was definitely rushed and likely a fuller title meant to waste time between higher grade shows rather than actually contribute anything new to the genre.

Personal rating: 10+

Episodes: 12
Languages: sub
Official rating: PG
Genre: Romance, drama
Production: Studio Pierrot
Company: Dentsu Tech/BS TBS
Official streaming: crunchyroll

Kiss Him, Not Me Review

kiss-him-not-meStory:
Kae Serinuma loves boy love! And by “love” we mean she’s “obsessed.” So when she manages to attract the attention of four very handsome young classmates, she can’t help but ship them together, much to the young men’s distress.

Violence:
Besides slap stick, comedy nose bleeds and a few flashes to the shows Serinuma likes, not too bad. This said, one episode contains some violent history on a warlord with makes the blood more serious as it’s not for comedy purposes. These flashes are brief however.

Language:
Not much here besides some sh-ts and d-mns.

Nudity:
While there’s more fanservice of males than females in this show, it’s still surprisingly tame. Heck, Yuri on Ice had more shirtless scenes and suggestive camera angles than this one. So besides some suggestive talk between anime fans on their ships, not much here.

Theology/mythology:
Remember my mention of Japanese history up top? Well, that episode contains a strange arc where the characters supposedly battle a ghost. In the end it’s heavily implied they were all accidentally high off bad mushrooms (I’m not even kidding), so theoretically it never happened. Still, there’s a decent amount of temples and such in this show so if anything like that bugs you, be warned.

Personal impression:
This title was hilarious. While it still had more than its fair share of cliches, it also had a rather unique approach to drama as the heroine in question was nearly too otaku to function. A fact the male leads not only had to come to terms with, but accept. They also had to deal with the concept of loving Serinuma regardless of what weight she was.
Oh, I didn’t mention that earlier. The series actually starts out with our lead being overweight and not really seen as a romantic option by anyone (at first). She suddenly loses weight after her favorite character in a show dies and she goes into mourning. I was afraid at first that the issue of the male leads loving her simply for her body wouldn’t be addressed. Thankfully, I was wrong and the series actually took that one on. While the result was still rough around the edges, I appreciate how this show made it clear that Serinuma was lovable and desired, regardless of what her body looked like.
As for art and music, this show had nothing new to offer. And the ending wasn’t new either. If you hate shows that pretty much end where they began, this title isn’t for you. I’m just going to warn you now that this series follows one of the biggest shojou tropes ever: keeping the reverse harem intact at all costs. Interestingly enough, this didn’t put me off the show. Considering our lead’s personality, it was oddly fitting. Even so, it’s worth noting for those out there who want more heavy duty character progression in their anime.

Personal rating: Young adult

Episodes: 12
Languages: Sub
Official rating: TV14
Genres: Romance, comedy
Production: Brain’s Base
Company: TBS
Official streaming: Crunchyroll