How to Keep a Mummy Review

316f66ac53da69f228cdb0ad9ca887cdStory:
Sora lives alone, his father having gone on yet another research trip. And per tradition, Sora soon gets one of his father’s surprise “gifts” in the mail. Terrified it’s another cursed item, especially as it’s in a coffin, he prepares for the worst only to find a tiny little mummy inside! A mummy that very much wants to stay with Sora permanently.

Violence:
In a few flash backs we see one character with slashed arms. Blood is shown though not overly focused on or seen more than a handful of times. There is the threat of some mythical creatures being very dangers to humans, even threatening to kill them. We never see this happen however.

Language:
There are some instances of d-mn and sh-t, but it’s not too common. One instance of the b-word occurs.

Nudity:
Some bath scenes with Sora are seen, but no details are shown and it’s not in a sexual light.

Theology/mythology:
This show contains all manner of both Japanese and western mythologies, with a few from the middle east thrown in (although it’s hilarious to note that the non-Japanese creatures tend to have their backgrounds mixed up quite a lot with various other tales. The mummy comes to Sora in a western style coffin, complete with Christian cross).

Personal impression:
This is defiantly one of those cute for the sake of being cute shows. Think of Hamtaro, but with more of an emphasis on the human characters interacting with the cute creatures than the creatures interacting with each other. It was ok for what it was, there was even some decent character development for a few of the leads, specifically the lead and his childhood friend. That said, there’s really not much substance to this one. And the last few episodes feel like the screenwriter suddenly decided to make their human characters x-men rip offs (one character climbs up a sheer cliff with his bare hands out of no where).
If you want cute fluff, this show will deliver. It even has a small amount of characters facing unspoken fears and growing a bit. Just not a lot.

Personal rating: 10+

Episodes: 12
Languages: sub
Official rating: TV14
Genres: Supernatural, slice of life
Studio: 8-Bit
Company: TBS
Official streaming: crunchyroll

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A Place Further then the Universe Review

89879Story:
Kimari yearns to accomplish something big in her high school years. When she runs into Shirase, a girl dedicated to making it to Antarctica, the last place her mother was before her death, she may have gotten into something bigger than she expected or can handle.

Violence:
One character dies off screen. We never see anything violent in nature, but very young viewers might get scared during some of the flashbacks. It’s a serious concept that never leaves the show and is brought up more than once.

Language:
Sh-t and d-mn are the worst this show gets, though it keeps to the lighter side.

Nudity:
Considering the all female cast, I would have expected the usual unnecessary fanservice, but we are spared any of that, which is awesome.

Theology/mythology:
Aside from a few scenes showing an alter where Shirase’s mother’s photo is, religion really doesn’t come into play here.

Personal impression:
I came back from my hiatus for this show. Because it’s amazing. Really, really amazing and I did NOT see that coming considering what a train wreck the story summery is on Crunchyroll. But here we are, with me pretty much all set to call this show anime of the year for 2018. It might be a bit early, but every other show this year is going to have to work insanely hard to beat this title.
But enough of that. What exactly made this show great? First and foremost is the script. The dialog alone let me know in episode one that this show had some serious promise. It wasn’t stiff or contrived, but conversations flowed in a logical manor. It was dialog that made sense and felt natural at all times, a hard find in anime these days. Then the plot. It was character based, focused on character’s individual motivations for going to Antarctica first rather then just getting there to get there. And their motivations made sense. Again, no forced reasons. Each character comes to their conclusions in a surprisingly reasonable manor and not only are those reasons easy to follow, but they are also easy to sympathize with. Show-don’t-tell is used frequently as well, which means even if a character doesn’t spell something out, you can often read both their personality and motives clearly int heir actions and expressions.
Which brings me to the cinematography, which is breathtaking. From camera angles to how scenes are cut and edited, this show really out does itself. The paring with the soundtrack is nearly seamless as well, punching you in the feels over and over.
And last, but never least: this story has a conclusion. The lead characters grow to where they want and need to be, even if what they needed wasn’t something they thought they wanted at first. It’s an incredibly fulfilling end to such an emotional show and it leaves you with a bright feeling of triumph as well.
There are cons though. Primarily in the strength itself. This show will make you cry. A lot. If you aren’t ready for your heart to be destroyed over and over, this isn’t for you. Granted, it’s a good cry. A healing one. Not sad things for the sake of being sad. Stuff moves forward, characters grow. Still, it’s an emotional roller coaster so it’s something you need to be in the mood for.
In conclusion: this show is one of the best I’ve seen in a very long time and is defiantly the show to beat this year. I look forward to seeing some shows make the attempt. At the very least, I hope more directors learn from how this show used movement and angles to add to the story and solidify it as real, despite the extreme journey the girls were taking on. Because while I love how out-of-the-box anime often is, having a world and characters that feel real goes a long way towards pushing a show from good to great. And when you have a character driven story to boot? It’s pretty much a recipe for perfection.

Personal rating: 10+

Episodes: 13
Languages: sub
Official rating: TV14
Genre: Adventure, drama, literary fiction
Studio: Madhouse
Company: Kadokawa Pictures
Official streaming: crunchyroll

Kenka Bancho Otome -Girl Beats Boys- Review

kaStory:
Hinako was an orphan until she runs into her look alike on the street and gets “adopted” by his gangster family and roped into posing as him and joining an all boys school notorious for thugs and violence. Now she must beat each grade’s lead boss to gain control of the school and keep up appearances for her “long lost twin.”

Violence:
Despite how much fighting goes on, actual blood is kept low to nill. It’s mostly bruising from punches. Nothing graphic.

Language:
This is the worst the show gets, though it’s still tame overall. Some sh-ts and d-mns, but not that often. Then again, this entire show is super short so it’s not like there’s much time for it anyway.

Nudity:
Aside from a plot point where one character takes off his shirt to prove he’s a guy, nothing to put here.

Theology/mythology:
This section couldn’t be more empty if it tried.

Personal impression:
This wasn’t bad, actually. Not good, mind you. Though I feel as if the length worked against this show the most in that regard. See, with a set up like this, I was thinking we’d end up with some weird Ouran High School knock off. We actually… don’t? And that actually worked out better, I think. The lead’s main drive is having friends and family. She’s been alone all her life and that’s honestly all she wants. Romance doesn’t occur at all. Which is good. But also odd. The show seems to drop in and out of romantic tones at random, despite the lead not only being oblivious, but also not desiring any romantic connections at all. It makes for a show that feels confused. Like it can’t decide if it’s a traditional reverse harem, or an oddly strong female lead action show promo. Just a promo. The “plot” is far too weak to call this anything else.
Again, I actually kinda like the set up. The lead wants something most people can strongly identify with and would go a long way towards showing female and male non-sexual relationships, which tend to be lacking in media in general no matter what side of the Pacific ocean you live on. Plus the fight scenes are actually decently animated, especially those involving the lead, who is a very good fighter. You can tell most of the budget went solely to those scenes. It’s nice to see genuine action from a lead, especially a female one, done in a grounded fashion and with no sexualized undertones.
Sadly the short time of each episode, and the focus wavering between friendship focus and a forced romance angle, hurt this show pretty bad. I enjoyed it now and again, but overall this show is far too short to accomplish much at all. Which is a shame. The basic idea isn’t bad. But it needs to be fully committed to and needs time to build up. Two things which just aren’t going to happen considering this is based off an otome game and it seems to have gotten only a skeleton budget.

Personal rating: 10+

Episodes: 12 (8 min each)
Languages: sub
Official rating: TV14
Genre: action, otome
Studio: n/a
Company: EMON
Official streaming: crunchyroll